Emil Weddige

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Emil Weddige

2,500.00

Tenement Ruins

Oil on canvas, circa 1930

Signed lower left

22 x 30 1/4

Condition: very good

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I consider this painting to be an outstanding example of the work of Michigan artist Emil Weddige.  Would it be too much to say that this painting is Weddige’s masterpiece?

I acquired this painting from an art dealer in the Chicago area.  He acquired it at auction.  It is the best painting I have ever seen by Emil Weddige and is very reminiscent of the work of Edward Hopper. 

As for condition, there is some craquelure in a few areas as you would expect from a painting that is over 80 years old.  This is particularly the case in the upper left, but it is not bad at all.  There is no buckling of the pigment and no paint loss.  The surface is completely stable and in very good condition.

The biographical statement below is an edited excerpt from a posting on askart:

Emil Weddige (1907-2001) was born of American parents in Sandwich, Ontario, Canada on December 23, 1907.  He showed artistic talent early on, and received his BA at Eastern Michigan University in 1904, later studying at the Art Students League in New York under Morris Kantor and at Woodstock under Emil Ganso.  

In 1937 he joined the University of Michigan Art Department as an instructor, later receiving his Master of Arts there.  In 1957, he was appointed professor of art at the University of Michigan, and, in 1974, became a professor emeritus.  He retired that year, to devote himself to his art and his chosen medium, stone lithography.

Emil Weddige is widely acknowledged as one of the pioneers in the rebirth of color lithography.  His book on the subject, titled Lithography and published in 1966, is regarded as the definitive text on lithography by most colleges and universities in the United States.

Works by Emil Weddige can be found in the following institutions: the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the National Gallery, Washington, D. C., the Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, the University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, and the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris.