Odilon Redon

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Odilon Redon

3,500.00

Elle Tire De Sa Poitrine Une Eponge Toute Noire, La Couvre De Baisers

Lithograph on heavy, cream wove paper, 1896

From the first edition of 50 impressions from 1896

Unsigned, as issued 

Plate VIII from La Tentation de Saint Antoine, Third Series

7 9/16 x 6 inches

Reference: Mellerio 141

Condition: excellent aside from some waviness at the edges of the sheet

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In English, the title is as follows: “She draws from her bosom a sponge, perfectly black, and covers it with kisses.”

Below is a brief biographical statement from http://www.britannica.com/biography/Odilon-Redon, written by the editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica: 

Odilon Redon, (born April 20, 1840, BordeauxFrance—died July 6, 1916, Paris) French Symbolist painter, lithographer, and etcher of considerable poetic sensitivity and imagination, whose work developed along two divergent lines. His prints explore haunted, fantastic, often macabre themes and foreshadowed the Surrealistand Dadaist movements. His oils and pastels, chiefly still lifes with flowers, won him the admiration of Henri Matisse and other painters as an important colourist.

Redon studied under Jean-Léon Gérôme; mastered engraving from Rodolphe Bresdin, who exerted an important influence; and learned lithography under Henri Fantin-Latour. His aesthetic was one of imagination rather than visual perception. His imagination found an intellectual catalyst in his close friend, the Symbolist poetStéphane Mallarmé. Redon was also associated with the group of Symbolist painters.

Redon produced nearly 200 prints, beginning in 1879 with the lithographs collectively titled In the Dream. He completed another series (1882) dedicated toEdgar Allan Poe, whose poems had been translated into French with great success by Mallarmé and Charles Baudelaire. Rather than illustrating Poe, Redon’s lithographs are poems in visual terms, themselves evoking the poet’s world of private torment. There is an evident link to Goya in Redon’s imagery of winged demons and menacing shapes, and one of his series was the Homage to Goya (1885).

About the time of the print series The Apocalypse of St. John (1889), Redon began devoting himself to painting and colour drawing—sensitive floral studies, and heads that appear to be dreaming or lost in reverie. He developed a unique palette of powdery and pungent hues. Though there is a relationship between his work and that of the Impressionist painters, he opposed both Impressionism and Realism as wholly perceptual.